CURRENTLY ON DISPLAY AT THE
MUSEUM OF ARTS & SCIENCES

 

Flapper Style: 1920s Fashion
Edward E. and Jane B. Ford Gallery
Opening December 3, 2016 through January 22, 2017

The flapper is widely seen as the epitome of 1920s glamor and decadence. The term refers to the generation of young women who came to age just as World War I ended and shocked the older generation with their short hair and short skirts, their drinking, smoking, and swearing. Flappers faced a world strikingly different from the one their mothers knew and their clothing reflected this dramatic break with the past.

The "Roaring Twenties" were renowned for their exuberant parties and jazz music, which were reflected in the glittering fringe fashion that women wore. However, this exhibition looks beyond the quintessential beaded dress to explore the range of influences on fashion from sportswear to artistic movements such as Bauhaus and Art Deco. Standards of beauty in the 1920s shifted to celebrate youth with a fashionable silhouette that was slim and boyish. 

The exhibition includes more than forty pieces including undergarmets, evening wraps, sportswear, menswear and footwear from Kent State University Art Museum, which contains one of the country's most important couture collections.

 

Truth in Jest: 200 Years of Social Satire and Humor in Western Art
Karshan Center of Graphic Art
Opening November 5, 2016 through January 22, 2017

Throughout history artists have used humor in their works to call attention to social issues or simply to entertain. Works illustrating this in the MOAS collection span nearly 200 years with famous examples by Honoré Daumier (French, 1808-1879), France’s first and most important social satirist, to those by Norman Rockwell (American, 1894-1978), 20th Century America’s favorite social commentator.

Honoré Daumier became famous for frequently publishing in Les Charivari over the course of many years as he critiqued French culture, society and politics in his cartoons.  In the “Histoire Ancienne” (Ancient History) series he weighed in on the intense debate in the 1840s between Classicism and Romanticism.  Leading proponents of Romantic art, such as Eugene Delacroix (1798-1863), felt that artists should let go of the tired classical ideal and Daumier jumped into the fray by making fun of classical myth.  Here he shows the mighty Hercules reduced to a common stable hand as he mucks out King Augeas’s stables, the fifth labor assigned to him by King Eurystheus.  According to the Greek myth, this was a monumental task as the livestock numbered over 3,000 and the stable had not been cleaned in 30 years. Hercules was given only one day to complete the job and Daumier’s super hero looks less than happy with the task ahead. 

The Legacy of Abstraction: Late 20th Century Paintings from the Collection
Root Hall
Now through 2017

Focused primarily on artists with strong Florida ties, this exhibition of large-scale contemporary paintings from the collection pays testament to the lasting legacy of mid-twentieth century American and European Abstration. Postwar artists such as Jackson Pollock, Lee Krasner, Franz Kline, Robert Motherwell, Barnett Newman, Mark Rothko, and the later Anselm Kiefer - to name only a few - brought non-representational art into the mainstream. Due to their influence - as well as many others within the Abstract Art movement - geometry, texture, spontaneous painted gestures and dramatic color juxtapositions would dominate art in the latter half of the twentieth century. The artists on view in this installation owe a debt in no small measure to the lasting impact of the giants of Modernist Abstraction.

 

Celebrating our Smithsonian Affiliation
A Place for All People: Introducing the National Museum of African American History and Culture
Lobby
Now through 2017

A Place for All People: Introducing the National Museum of African American History and Culture is a commemorative poster exhibition celebrating the opening of the Smithsonian's newest museum Sept. 24, 2016. Based on the inaugural exhibitions of the museum, the posters highlight key artifacts that tell the rich and diverse story of the African American experience.

A Place for All People is organized by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES) in collaboration with the museum. 

 

Let's Advertise
North Wing Corridor
Opening October 1, 2016 through January 15, 2017

By the last half of the Nineteenth Century, lithographs from stone plates had reached a high level of artistic achievement. Beautiful images could be mass produced at a modest cost providing manufacturers with a new media for the promotion of their products. Ad Cards became the media of choice during the period. They were used by all manufacturers, merchants and trades people. 

Because there was not "truth in advertising" merchants were free to say anything they wished about their products. Many of the product claims are outrageous to the point of being humorous. Products also contain harmful or addictive ingredients which eventually led to the passing of Federal food and drug laws. This exhibit is a window into the past where one can see how people lived, what they wore and ate, how they were entertained, and how exposed they were to the exaggeration and claims of advertisers. 

The works are from the Thomas H. Davis Collection, in care of the Museum of Arts & Sciences. 

 

Forms of Fancy: Sculptures from the MOAS Collection
Bouchelle Court of Changing Exhibits
Now through July 23, 2017

 

From the oldest piece, an ancient tomb figure from China, to the newest piece, a 21st century painted ceramic "Kitty Hawk", this exhibit represents 2,000 years of sculpture from across the globe. 

King Solomon, Alexander Archipenko

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CURRENTLY ON DISPLAY AT THE
CICI AND HYATT BROWN MUSEUM OF ART

Views of St. Augustine - 100 Years
A. Worley Brown & Family Gallery
Opening December 17, 2016

St. Augustine is the oldest continuously occupied European-established settlement within the borders of the United States. A brief history of the city begins in the 16th century. It was founded on September 8, 1565, by Spanish admiral Pedro Menéndez de Avilés, Florida’s first governor. He had first sighted land on August 28, the feast day of St. Augustine. The city served as the capital of Spanish Florida for over 200 years.

Spain ceded Florida to the United States in 1819, and when the treaty was ratified in 1821, St. Augustine was designated the capital of the Florida Territory until Tallahassee was made the capital in 1824. Since the late 19th century, St. Augustine’s distinct historical character has made the city a major tourist attraction.

The two works by George Harvey in this exhibition show us the Plaza of the Constitution and a view to the fort from a location just west of the north gate in the 1850’s. After these scenes were recorded, in 1861 Florida joined the Confederacy after the Civil War and Confederate authorities remained in control of St. Augustine for fourteen months, even though it was barely defended, and in spite of the Union blockade of shipping off the coast. Union troops occupied St. Augustine in 1862 and controlled the city though the rest of the war. A small watercolor depicts a blue-coated Union soldier sometime after the Union occupation. The town’s economy already devastated, many of the citizens fled.

Henry Flagler, a co-founder of the Standard Oil Company, spent the winter of 1883 in the city and found it charming, but considered its hotels and transportation systems inadequate. He had the idea to make St. Augustine a winter resort for wealthy Americans from the north, and to bring them south he bought several short line railroads and combined these in 1885 to form the Florida East Coast Railway. He built a railroad bridge over the St. Johns River in 1888, opening up the Atlantic coast of Florida to development.

Flagler began construction in 1887 of two large hotels, the 540-room Ponce de León Hotel and the Hotel Alcazar, and bought the Casa Monica Hotel the next year. His chosen architectural firm, Carrére and Hastings, radically altered the appearance of St. Augustine and give it a skyline characterized by the use of the Moorish Revival style. With the opening of the Ponce in 1888, St. Augustine became the winter resort of American high society.

After the Florida East Coast Railroad had been extended southward, the rich mostly abandoned St. Augustine in the early 20th. St. Augustine nevertheless still attracted tourists, and eventually became a destination for families traveling in automobiles. Calendar art presents a Chrysler Airflow parked outside the Oldest House verifying the new mode by which to visit the city. The tourist industry soon became the dominate sector of the local economy. With the help of state and federal government monies, St. Augustine began a program in 1935 to preserver thirty-six surviving colonial buildings and reconstruct others that were gone.

In 1965, St. Augustine celebrated the quadricentennial of its founding, and with funds from the State, began to restore part of the colonial city. Paintings after that date reflect the restored condition of their subjects. In 2015, St. Augustine celebrated the 450th year of its founding with an exhibition of historic art works from the Brown Collection including many of the works in this gallery. 

The Seminole and the Everglades
Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art - France Family Gallery
Through 2016

The Everglades is a region of tropical wetlands that occupies the southern portion of Florida. Water leaving the vast, shallow Lake Okeechobee in the wet season forms a slow-moving river 60 miles wide and over 100 miles long. 

Human habitation in the southern portion of the Florida peninsula dates from 15,000 years ago. The region was dominated by the native Calusa and Tequesta tribes. After European colonization, both tribes declined. The Seminole nation emerged out of groups of Native Americans, mostly Creek from what are now the northern Muscogee peoples.

Artists from the early 19th century on have found the visual characteristics of the people and the land compelling subjects for artworks. The climatic conditions change frequently giving new dimensions of color, motion, and light to the landscape. The dramatic variables are a challege to the painting attempting to capture a specific moment. The flora and fauna are often unique and fascinating. Rending them is as often for scientific documentation as it is for decorative motif. 

Featured painting: James F. Hutchinson; Seminole Man, 1992

 

Florida Weather
Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art - France Family Gallery
Through 2016

Experience a myriad of Florida weather in just one day. The Florida Weather gallery offers a look into Florida weather as represented by art. Florida is known for weather that changes with uncanny speed. Sun, rain, wind, clouds, storms and fog all play a part in what the artist sees and wants to capture. The color, technique, rhythm and texture are all focused to evoke the full sensation of what is Florida's revealing environmental trait.

Featured painting: Ernest Lawson; Approaching Storm, Matheson Hammock, Coral Gables, Florida, ca. 1930

Women Painting Florida
Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art 
Through 2016

An exhibit dedicated to women who created an amazingly diverse group of wonderful images in a wide range of mature styles, all contributing to the glorious chronicle of Florida art. 

Featured painting: Edith Wyckoff Kuchler; Packing Barn, ca. 1940

 

 

Volusia County
Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art
Through 2016

The Volusia County gallery contains paintings with the county as the subject. Volusia County has encouraged both well-known and less-known artists to portray the environments and people from the county from the last quarter of the 19th century and on. 

Featured painting: James Calvert Smith; Stop the Train, ca. 1950

 

 

 

 

Exhibits and Dates Subject to Change